Can the Shark Tank effect drive traffic for an LTO?

Shark Tank, the ABC show in which entrepreneurs pitch their products to investors, has become a hitmaker. The show, based on the international program Dragon’s Den has been airing in the US since 2009. When brands appear on the show, things happen in the marketplace.

For the successful guests, fortunes change visibly. They not only receive investment funding from a famed Shark, but they also earn mentorship and network power – tying into the Shark’s other businesses and processes. These brands tend to blow up in retail. You have no doubt seen clusters of products from the show or even clusters from individual Sharks in retailers like Bed Bath & Beyond, Walgreens and Home Depot.

Even for entrepreneurs who fail to earn a deal, the show has the power to drive interest and sales of the product. Garrett Gee walked away without a deal to fund his app Scan in 2013 but the app became the number one app in the iPhone and Windows app stores due to exposure from the show.

There have been a few dining success stories. Cousins Maine Lobster food trucks earned a deal that has driven their expansion across the country. Grilled Cheese concept Tom & Chee is now in 14 states after earning investment on the show and being featured in updates.

Now, CKE’s Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s are attempting to earn some capital of their own by partnering with the show. In an episode from 2013, Shark Daymond John invested in a patented boneless pork rib product – Bubba’s Boneless Ribs. The product had been featured in several follow up episodes but success was not immediately clear. In a recent episode, the founder and John appeared in a visit to Carl’s Jr./Hardee’s headquarters to finalize a deal to provide the product for the new Baby Back Rib Burger.

The brands have made overt efforts to turn their image away from the sexy girls eating messy burgers. The appearance on Shark Tank is not exactly aligned with the more dramatic efforts the brands have made, but certainly a departure from the bikini era.

The show claims 8-10 million regular viewers, no mean feat in today’s fragmented media environment. CKE reached a group of consumers with information about a product they had been learning about for 4 years to announce their new sandwich. Where the brands may have missed on reaching a mass audience with their recent activation on Twitch, they have capitalized on this loyal audience with a strong product introduction.

There are two related questions. First, who exactly did they reach? Assuming the brands are driving in include a slightly more balanced gender in their new media strategy; they have achieved that. But from an age standpoint, they probably missed their largely young male audience getting a large portion of Gen X and Boomers (gasp) in this Shark Tank play.

Second, will viewers turn out for a sandwich like they have for products like the Scrub Daddy? The top performing products have tended to be no-brainers, like a better sponge or a simpler way to exercise. This burger is far from a no-brainer for average consumers. It will appeal much more to males, and hungry males at that. What is not known is the cost CKE paid for the appearance, if any. Without that data, it is impossible to judge the move.

Time will tell whether the Shark Tank effect can carry an LTO.