3 things restaurant brands better learn from Brandless. Fast.

There’s been a ton of coverage of Amazon over the past few months. First, they bought Wholefoods. Then they announced a meal delivery service almost immediately. While all that was going on, a few articles appeared about a company called Brandless. If you haven’t yet heard about it, the company is founded on several important beliefs which you need to understand if you want to compete today.

1. Everything they sell at Brandless is $3.

It’s simple because customers hate complexity. Everything – everything – on their site today is available for $3. There’s nothing to think about. Handsoap? $3. Coffee K-cups? $3. Mustard? $3.

2. Brandless turned lack of grocery distribution from a weakness into a strength.

This is classic disruption. Knowing that it’s next to impossible to get broad product lines into grocery chains, they instead focused on direct distribution. This not only allows them direct access to their customers – they don’t have to trust grocery staffers to help sell the product or protect the experience – they also realized they didn’t have to account for the retailer mark-up. Hence Point 1.

3. Brandless rendered lack of brand awareness meaningless.

By choosing the name Brandless along with a generic look and feel they’ve risen above the marketing fray. They’ve said we can’t compete against hundred year old brands on their terms, so we’ll fight by diminishing the importance of ‘brands.’

This is a coup. Brandless appeals to younger consumers that are less loyal, especially to legacy brands. It makes of its products certified organic, gluten free, non-GMO, vegan, no added sugar and certified kosher to make sure it is all inclusive. To be fair, this is a well executed gimmick, albeit a clever one. Look for a company like Amazon to purchase Brandless in the next 18 months.

OK. So how does this relate to the restaurant business?

Reduce barriers to purchase.

They are starting with products that reduce barriers to consumption. By making products that cut out sugar, GMO and non-vegan ingredients, they’re making it easier to buy them. They built it this way from scratch, intentionally. Today’s younger consumers don’t start with a baseline expectation that things don’t fit their requirements. They demand products that meet their needs. Especially food. Make it hard to meet their dietary needs and they’re not coming back.

Don’t make consumers think about prices.

Second, they made pricing super simple. In the grocery store, people hate the way stores force them to compare prices. Especially since young consumers are more likely to shop at multiple stores to achieve their regular grocery shopping. Pricing in restaurants it’s not much different. They want it to be obvious that the price is fair for what they’re getting. Can you make everything on your menu $3? Probably not. But could you stand to streamline pricing? Definitely. Make it easy to understand.

Control the experience.

How many times will you read that the experience is all-important to consumers? For most brands, one time too few. Brandless controls every part of the experience. Consumers buy and receive products directly from them. This is an advantage over brands that are at the mercy of retailers to present the brand correctly, or next to a competitor that makes them look favorable. People choose everything from taxis, to musicians and now toilet paper based on the experience. What are you doing to improve the one you offer?

Brandless is currently selling CPG space and coming after established brands. It probably has nothing to do with your business if you are in the restaurant space. One thing we have learned from the digital disruption of the past 15 years is that a successful business model is replicated in every other sector. Soon, someone will launch an unbranded restaurant concept that reduces barriers, offers simple pricing and a controlled, positive experience. Today, you have a chance to pre-empt the success of that concept. Tomorrow? Who knows.

How long is the long tail in CPG product innovation?

Every day, new CPG product ideas are born, many for niche customer bases. For how long can the long tail be profitable? Let’s discuss.

grocery, retail, shelf, CPG, innovation, product, sales, marketing, strategy, customer
With retail shelf space at a premium, how do new CPG products find their niche?

On this episode of the Food & Restaurant Marketing Podcast Dan and Adam look at the uphill climb of CPG products clawing for shelf space. Every brand is born from the idea of solving a need for an ideal customer, but most aren’t able to distill that vision. We discuss the challenges from the brand and the retailer side of the issue.

How can new CPG products and brands make the leap from idea to success? Let’s dive in.

Prefer to read along, have at it with our transcript, here.

Transcriptions by Go Transcript.

 

Growing an emerging brand: three key factors for success

watering can, new product, CPG

Growing an emerging brand in the CPG space takes a special focus and attention.

A growing consumer package goods company can efficiently and effectively create demand and generate trial with limited distribution and a limited budget. The way it’s done is by doing a few things well and with great precision.

It’s important to remember when setting a precise strategy, you must sacrifice some things you think you want to do. Staying focused on what’s working will prevent you from straying to random tactics and getting off message. There are three critical components to an effective marketing strategy for most emerging brands. They’re designed to focus your limited budget on the optimal tactics and messages through a test and optimize approach. More on that later. The three critical components are: geo-targeting, target audience, and optimal messaging.

1. Geo-targeting

Geo-target your promotional investment in your best markets. Examine your ACV in each market to ensure people will be able to find your product once you create an interest.

You need to understand who your best and most likely customer is.

Start by identifying your top five designated market areas (DMAs) based on where you have the best distribution. Your primary objective is to generate awareness so you can generate trial. Several great ways to generate that awareness include: paid search, paid social, and online video. All tactics can be implemented relatively inexpensively.

2. Target audience

Have a precise target audience for your product. Do not try to reach broad demographics like “Adults 25-54.” It’s not efficient. You want to understand who your best and most likely customer is. You’ll base this not only on gender and age, but also with a clear psychographic profile. Understanding who your raving fans are is important so you can use all the digital targeting tools available today to go find more people with the same profile. When setting your target there are several tools available, like social listening, Facebook Insights and Google Analytics.

3. Optimal messaging

Create optimal messaging that will resonate, engage and motivate your audience. Because you are implementing the test and optimize model, there is no need to limit your message options. Since you’re early in your marketing efforts you want to test a variety of approaches to determine which ones resonate with your audience and creates the best click through rates and conversions.

As you learn what advertising messages and types are generating click through and conversion, you optimize your advertising spend on the most effective ads.

Consumers are looking for new products all the time. They’re interested in new flavors, new options to replace old favorites or they’re just trying new products out of curiosity, and they use a variety of channels to seek them out. Whether it’s search, social channels or websites; emerging brands need to get their message out there so we can discover your great new product.